Monthly Archives: June 2015

A STEAL! – How to knit vertical buttonholes ….

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I don’t suppose knitting daily  will object to me stealing the latest offering I found in my email box just now – smile.  They are part of the Interweave Group, which covers spinning & weaving as well as knitting and other crafts.  You may find their books, e-books and tutorials useful, altho’ you will have to pay for them.  This is one of their rare freebies!

 

Learn It: The Vertical Buttonhole
Kathleen Cubley
Editor, Knitting Daily
KnittingDaily.com
16ButtonCardi2
Sixteen Button Cardigan
by Cecily Glowik Macdonald

We’re celebrating the 10th anniversary of Knitscene, and I’ve had the pleasure of looking through my collection of back issues in preparation for writing this newsletter. I discovered a well-loved copy of the spring 2009 issue, featuring a wonderful tutorial on buttonholes, by technical editor Karen Frisa. It also contains a pattern called the Sixteen Button Cardigan. Yeah. That’s a lot of buttonholes. But it’s so cute!

I have a love-hate relationship with buttonholes, leaning a little more toward the hate than the love. Mine tend to be too loose, which is a bummer when the buttons slip out of the holes. For one cardigan, I had to resort to sewing up parts of each of the buttonholes to make them tighter, and they ended up too tight, so the cardigan is now a pullover. Not the best solution.

In her article, Karen talks about vertical buttonholes, which intrigue me, especially for buttonbands with vertical ribbing. Here’s an excerpt of that article for you.

Working a Vertical Buttonhole

What did you think of your last buttonholes? Were they a little loose? Too tight? Didn’t work well with the stitch pattern on your band? Maybe you haven’t even made a buttonhole before.

Knitters can take two approaches when it comes to pairing buttons and buttonholes: choose the button first, then create a buttonhole that works with it; or choose the buttonhole first, then choose a button that works with it.

1Vertical-buttonhole
Vertical Buttonhole

In either case, aim for a hole that is a little snug for your button, so that the button won’t slip back through the hole unexpectedly. Here’s how to make one of the lesser used but very nice buttonholes, a vertical buttonhole.

The vertical buttonhole can be sized to fit your button, but the opening is vertical rather than horizontal. This variation can be nice when working in ribbing or another stitch pattern with a strong vertical line, but it is a little fiddly to work. The vertical split for this buttonhole is made by working up one side of the buttonhole, then breaking the yarn, rejoining it at the bottom of the buttonhole, and working up the other side.

Make this buttonhole as follows: Work to the buttonhole location. *Turn, work to end of row, turn, work to buttonhole location; repeat from * until buttonhole is the correct height. Break yarn. Rejoin yarn to bottom of buttonhole. Work to end of row. *Work to buttonhole location, turn, work to end of row; repeat from * until buttonhole is the correct height. On next row, work across all stitches. This last step closes the top of the buttonhole.

The yarn ends can be used to reinforce the top and bottom of the buttonhole.

—Karen Frisa, Knitscene Spring 2009

The topic of buttonholes brings up buttonbands. Here are some tips for knitting great buttonbands.

Buttonband Tips

• Use a knitting needle one or even two sizes smaller than the one used for the body of the garment. This smaller size will make a firmer band that is less likely to droop.

• When picking up stitches for a band, consider the stitch gauge of the band pattern versus the row gauge of the garment. For example, if your band stitch pattern has five stitches per inch, and if your garment has seven rows per inch, then pick up five stitches for every seven rows on the garment. You could do this as follows: *pick up 1 stitch in each of next 3 rows, skip 1 row, pick up 1 stitch in each of next 2 rows, skip 1 row; rep from * for length of band. This sequence makes a band that lies flat.

• Buttons don’t need to be evenly spaced. Clustering buttons in groups of two or three along a band can be pretty and unexpected.

• Choose buttons that complement your garment in terms of size and weight as well as style. Too many heavy buttons on a lightweight garment can pull it out of shape; tiny buttons on a heavier garment can be lost. Shank buttons create some room for the knitted fabric behind the button. If you have a delicate fabric, place a backing button (a small, thin button) or a piece of felt on the wrong side of the band (inside the garment) behind the visible button.

• Traditionally, buttonholes for a woman’s or girl’s garment are on the right band (as it’s worn); for a man’s or boy’s, they’re on the left.

These are the types of articles you’ve come to expect in Knitscene , along with fashion-forward designs and styling. We’re offering a terrific collection to celebrate Knitscene‘s 10th birthday: a collection of every issue of Knitscene since it’s debut, plus all of the Accessories issues. Get yours today, in print or digital.

Here’s to better buttonholes, and to 10 years of Knitscene.

Cheers,
1KCsig

Alice in Wonderland Inspired Garden Ornaments & Fun Metal Wall Plaques anyone?

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Sometimes, I just buy things I like – whatever they are, and see if others like them as much as I do – so these new stock items are not strictly crafts supplies, but they are interesting “craft” gift items.

I just bought one of each of these usual ‘Alice in Wonderland’ inspired garden ornaments – you can also display them on your shelves inside too – and can find them on my 85solway ebay page HERE.  If you want any more of these, I can always order them in for you!

Alice in Wonderland inspired ceramic garden ornaments

Alice in Wonderland inspired ceramic garden ornaments

And the other new stuff I have in are two series of quirky metal door or wall plaques – you can use them inside or outside – and can find them on the 85solway ebay account too – HERE & HERE!

5 pretty wall plaques - size approx 6 x 8"

5 pretty wall plaques – size approx 6 x 8″

3 quirky metal wall plaques - size approx 8 x 12"

3 quirky metal wall plaques – size approx 8 x 12″

 

In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry – 1970

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Just thought you might enjoy this – it’s from “the spare”, my other blog – smile

the spare

Its the season of Summer – the solstice was yesterday – and the summer festivals – especially Glastonbury – are about to start!

Oh I remember, I remember, being young and in love and dancing to “In the Summertime” in a crowded sunny field somewhere in 1970!

So let’s have a bit more of that nostalgia – smile – you can dance along too if you feel like it!

The lyrics – below – would not pass the “thought police” these days – but here they are!

In The Summertime

written by Ray Dorset

[Chorus:]
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh

In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky
When the weather’s…

View original post 190 more words

Make An Upcycled Napkin Curtain – copied from Etsy

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laurafenton

Laura Fenton is a New York City-based writer and editor whose work has appeared in many publications, including Country LivingGood HousekeepingKinfolk and Parents. She is also the author of The Little House In The City.

After living for years in a top-floor apartment where curtains were unnecessary, I recently landed in a ground-floor unit that, despite its many selling points, happens to look directly into my new neighbors’ windows. Suddenly, attractive window coverings became a high priority — but one that, I quickly learned, cost a pretty penny. Instead of investing in off-the-shelf window dressings, I decided to make my own from an excess of beloved but rarely-used vintage napkins, amassed over a decade of digging in flea markets and secondhand shops. With a little bit of stitching, my incomplete and mismatched sets of dinner napkins became a charming patchwork curtain that’s sheer enough to let in lots of natural light, while still affording (priceless!) privacy.

To make your own, you’ll need a stash of napkins (tea towels and other vintage linens will work, too), a sewing machine, a few basic craft supplies, and the Tetris-like skills to piece your design together. Here’s how.

Etsy_Napkins_Materials

You will need: 

  • Napkins
  • Iron
  • Straight pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon
  • Measuring Tape

Rough-out-design

First, launder and dry your napkins. Then, rough out your curtain design by positioning the napkins in a pattern on the floor or across a large work surface. Make sure you have enough pieces to create a varied patchwork; when you reach an arrangement you like, snap a pic to refer to as you sew — or better yet, leave the napkins laid out as they are.

Etsy_Napkins_Iron

Iron napkins to remove any creases (and make them easier to pin and sew).

Etsy_Napkins_Pin

Begin pinning napkins together with straight pins, starting with the napkins in the center. Rather than lining up their edges precisely, you’ll want the napkins to overlap each other slightly, as shown.

Etsy_Napkins_Sew1

Use a zigzag stitch to sew along the overlapped edges. The zigzag stitch will add extra visual interest to the curtain (and it’s also a forgiving stitch for less-than-professional seamstresses). After you complete the center section, pin a few more loose napkins from your laid-out design to the edges of the sewn pieces and use the zigzag stitch to secure. Keep sewing and pinning until you have created one full curtain panel.

Tip: If your napkins don’t create a perfect rectangle, you may need to trim some of the perimeter napkins. (Just be sure to leave a bit of seam allowance so that you can still hem those cut edges.)

Etsy_Napkins_Ties

Next, cut several 20-inch pieces of ribbon to act as curtain ties. (Ties should be spaced about five to seven inches apart. We used nine ties for our 48-inch wide panel; measure to determine how many you will need.)

Etsy_Napkins_Ties_pinned

Fold each piece of ribbon in half, measure to determine to its position at the top of the panel, and pin to the back side of the curtain.

Etsy_Napkins_Sew

Next, sew one continuous zigzag stitch across the top hem of the curtain panel and each of the ribbon ties. Use the ties to hang the panel from your curtain rod.

Make-an-Upcycled-Napkin-Curtain

Photos and styling by Laura Fenton.

7,500 views on this site – WOW!

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celebrationtimeThis figure deserves a little celebration – its so nice to know that lots of people are reading this site!

As I mentioned in my last post the widget at the bottom or the blogroll also shows that the readership is truly international.

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

Some thoughts on “A Gallery of Your Work”

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This is a follow up to the GALLERY OF YOUR WORK, that appeared on 31 May 2015.

this beautiful summer dress was made for Val's holiday - we had a bit of a panic, because it seems Royal Mail lost her package - so I sent her another 4m of this very popular red poppy material - listed in julzcrafts supplies shop on etsy - and on the 85solway account on ebay.

this beautiful summer dress was made for Val’s holiday – we had a bit of a panic, because it seems Royal Mail lost her package – so I sent her another 4m of this very popular red poppy material – listed in julzcrafts supplies shop on etsy – and on the 85solway account on ebay.

I have just updated it to include this lovely dress that a customer of mine made out of one of the fabrics that I sell.

This was the first GALLERY  that I have tried putting together, and it has given rise to various comments from readers, and the information from the POLL I put up, has been useful.

I have been mulling over the idea, and the problems with it – smile.

It takes quite a lot for people to send it photos of their work, and actually, I am as shy about showing some of mine, especially when I don’t think I’ve got it quite right!  I’m not sure I would immediately think – oh what a great idea, I’ll send a picture to this blog – and if I didn’t know the writer – I’d be uncertain about how they would use the pictures.

So, let me try and reassure you – smile.

My intentions are nothing but honourable!

The idea was simply to give people a place to showcase their work, to give encouragement and to perhaps inspire others.  You see a great idea and it creates a spark that leads to you using some element of it to improve the work you do yourself.  It may not even be in the same medium, or directly comparable!

Now, a long time ago, I briefly started degree in Photography – this was after I had already been working as a Photographer for quite a while, and had initially trained with a quite well known commercial advertising photographer in London, so I was a mature student, and joined to see if I could improve my work – and well, to be honest, to get my hands on the large format cameras the college had, which I couldn’t afford!

Not for the first time I was subjected, along with the others on the course, to the vicious system of ‘crits’ – supposedly creative criticism of your work by the tutors.  With everyone else standing by and watching, and waiting for their turn.

I don’t know why these supposed ‘teachers’ thought it was fun to rip people’s work apart – the same happens in art colleges and other creative courses.  At best it might give you some idea of how others view what you have done – at worst – it totally destroys your enthusiasm for the subject!  Makes you feel worthless, and want to give up – even if you are incredibly talented!  And all abilities should be nurtured and encouraged by tutors – that’s what their job is supposed to be about.

this is a standard advertising still life I took years ago!

this is a standard advertising still life I took years ago!

Well I might not have been the best photographer around, but I knew that the course wasn’t going to give me what I wanted after the first term – so I left!  (OK – the courses were free at the time and I didn’t need the degree.)

The point is – besides me having a chance to show off some of my old work – smile – (you can see a selection of some of my other photos on “the spare“)

– that, if you were subjected to that kind of criticism in the past, you probably don’t want to put up a photo on a GALLERY HERE!

On the other hand, if you want to promote the work you sell, you might well be interested in getting some FREE PUBLICITY!

But the idea of the Gallery is not just for those few who, rightly, take any opportunity to publicise their work – it is for EVERYONE!

I am just as interested in seeing your first attempt at something, with all its faults, as the work with the professional finish that comes with years of experience.

You may find that someone who sees it can help you out with any problems you are having – and certainly, anyone who puts up their work here is not going to get ‘pulled to pieces’ – I moderate all comments, and will not allow any nasty ones to see the light of day!

It also seems that I have not made myself clear enough about what kind of work I will put up in a GALLERY.

THE ONLY STIPULATION IS THAT IT IS CRAFT RELATED – ANY CRAFT –

IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A TEXTILE CRAFT.

There are too many crafts to mention, but I will mention a few, just to make it obvious – there’s pottery, sculpture, glass work, ironwork, jewellery work, leatherwork, paperwork (not your accounts tho – smile), woodwork, re-cycling projects, mixed media etc etc – and of course anything to do with fabric, fibres and yarns.

What doesn’t qualify as a craft for the purposes of this exercise, is art work as in paintings etc (there are plenty of other places to show those) and videos – simply because they take up too much of my storage allowance!

And talking about storage space – please just send in ONE PHOT0. 

If you do send in more, I can, if I think it will show your work better, create a grid to put the other shots into the format of one image.  If you are not sure which photo will be best, you can send in more and let me choose which one to use.

THE PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE OF WORK YOU HAVE DONE IN THE PAST OR JUST RECENTLY.

NB:  If you would like to be featured in a SHOW & TELL you can send in as many photos as you like!

If you look at the bottom of the current GALLERY OF YOUR WORK, you will see that there is a note about copyright.  You own the copyright of the work and the photograph.  By sending the picture to me, you are only allowing me to use it in the Gallery, and I will ask your permission if I want to use it in any other way – as should anyone else that sees the blog – I strongly disagree with the idea of ‘stealing someone else’s work’.  However, it happens, so please don’t blame me if your picture appears elsewhere.  See my copyright info at the end of the blogroll on the right hand side of this page – and all pages!

this useful widget at the end of the said blogroll shows where the viewers come from

this useful widget at the end of the said blogroll shows where the viewers come from

The joy of the internet is that people from all over the world can see this blog and do! – I just took a snapshot of the latest figures for this blog – the widget here tells me where you all come from – and if you click on the actual widget at the end of my blogroll – you can see the that you are a truly INTERNATIONAL lot!

So – of course – the offer to host a picture of your work is open to anyone who reads this blog, or is a customer of mine and doesn’t bother to read it (smile), all over the world.

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS IDEA?

How about I keep this GALLERY IDEA GOING?

I am thinking about having constant open submission, without any deadlines.

(Open submission means that anyone can send in a photo of their work – and anything you send in gets published, unless we have agreed that this photo is not suitable for any reason)

However, the current gallery is now closedBUT as soon as I have at least 10 photos waiting to be published, I will create a new gallery and then the next set of photos will form the basis of the next gallery – with any luck this could run & run!

Your comments & ‘likes’ would be greatly appreciated – I am not on twitter or facebook, but would be happy if you would spread the word for me!  I will direct my mailing list of customers – who are several hundred in number – to this blog in my next “newz from julz” – so hopefully we will find that there are enough people interested in this idea to start the ball rolling!

(If you would like to join the mailing list – please fill in the form at the bottom of the SHOP TALK PAGE)

I LOOK FORWARD TO RECEIVING YOUR PICTURES!

If you don’t have my email address – I took it off the site because I was getting too much spam – please either fill in the form on the SHOP TALK PAGE or the one on the CONTACT ME PAGE – and I will reply to your email address so that you can send me some pictures!

THANKS

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