Category Archives: re-blog

Harris Tweed returns to Uig in the Hebrides


From NEW 3D WEAVING in the last post to AN OLD WEAVING TRADITION getting a new life.

I am no Luddite, and I don’t actually know what the Hattersley Domestic Loom, used by Harris Tweed Weavers looks like, but I was thinking about the fact that I came across both these articles at the same time, and I chose to feature the NEW over the OLD first, and that weaving as a commercial enterprise, such as HARRIS TWEED has a long history.  

Luddites were the original movement that objected to the “new commercial looms” in the late 1700’s – I vaguely remember from my school history lessons on the Industrial Revolution.

Would someone like to contribute an INFORMATION SHEET (i/sheet) on the topic?


Copied verbatim from the Herald Scotland – you can see the original newspaper article HERE.

Harris Tweed weaving returns to old haunts

Harris Tweed weaving returns to old haunts

It is worn by celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow and Madonna, showcased at Florentine and Parisian fashion shows and decorates everything from upmarket handbags and hotels to US motorcycle jackets.

But now Harris Tweed is rediscovering some of its own Hebridean roots with the return of weaving to the Uig area of Lewis for the first time in a quarter of a century.

And it is two young local men Domhnall Iain (D.I.) MacDonald in Gisla and Calum George Buchanan in Valtos who are leading its revival in communities on the west side of the island. There already are reports of considerable interest from others in the district who see weaving as a good means of earning their livelihoods locally.

For more than 50 years, Harris Tweed flourished in Uig. One of the last of the old weavers, Seonaidh Buchanan, recalls the first six Hattersley looms coming to Valtos in 1938. They cost £35 each and the weavers were paid £7 a tweed.

The Hattersley Domestic Loom was the mainstay of the industry for the best part of the 20th century.

First introduced to the islands after the First World War, the Hattersley Mark One, helped ex-servicemen who had lost hands and arms to earn a living through weaving. Its rate of production was superior to the wooden hand looms that preceded it and it was capable of weaving more complex patterns.

At the industry’s peak after the Second World War, there were 34 looms in the Valtos peninsula alone. In Uig as a whole, there were at least 100 weavers and for most of these families, the loom was the main source of income.

The industry went into sharp decline in the 1980s and the last of the Hattersley weavers in Uig retired in the early 1990s.

But Seonaidh’s son Calum George has been able to return to live in Valtos with his wife Mairi and infant son Fionnlagh because of the opportunity created by weaving. He already has his dad helping him at the painstaking business of tyIng in. “At first he wanted to find out if he could still do it. Now I can’t keep him away from it,” he said.

D.I. also had weaving in his family. His father and latterly his uncle in Gisla were weavers. D.I. continues to work two days a week for the council but says weaving gives him far more flexibility to be at home and help Ann with looking after their three year old son, Seumas, who already sits beside him as he weaves, watching every movement of the loom.

Neil MacLeod, chairman of the Harris Tweed Weavers Association, mentored Calum George, an effective way for new weavers to learn the skills. Neil said there are more than 60 people looking for looms, many of them working offshore and seeing this as a means of making their livings at home.

The chairman of Harris Tweed Hebrides, former Labour energy minister Brian Wilson, who lives in the Uig village of Mangersta, said: “It is great to see weaving back in Uig. This sums up why the Harris Tweed revival is so important.

“It allows weavers like D.I. and Calum George to remain in their own communities, earn good livelihoods and raise their families here. We just need to keep it going and ensure a strong, stable future for the industry”.

David Ross / Tuesday 11 August 2015 / Home News

and now – for something new – 3D Weaving!


I came upon this today – scary isn’t it !

New Technology is replacing us weavers ……


Unlike 3D Printing, 3D Weaving Uses

Old Techniques for Futuristic Forms

Designer Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu shows off an emerging method of clothes-weaving that overcomes 3D printing in range of texture and thread integrity

Designer Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu shows off an emerging method of clothes-weaving that overcomes 3D printing in range of texture and thread integrity

Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu’s graduation collection at Central St. Martins takes a close look at fashion’s most basic element, thread, and turns it into a malleable material with height, width and depth. Unlike in 3D printed clothing, Chen-Hsiang Hu’s collection moves into 3D territory without a clear jump off point.

On his website, he describes his creativity as “Dedicated to design and techno development.” His “Xi” collection pieces were all done in red, with laser-cut fabric that blend naturally into shapes that extend the human form. The cut-outs of the flat fabrics seem to predate the 3D forms, forming dark shadows that accentuate the protrusions. The designer won the L’Oreal Young Talent Award for his work on 3D weaving.

3D weaving is a minority in the world dominated by additive manufacturing. Instead of working on a shape layer-by-layer, 3D weaving requires special looms (Chen-Hsiang Hu used a bespoke one) and the shapes are built axis by axis. His collection was made with a combination of thread and resin.

However, automation in the complicated process isn’t impossible. Oluwaseyi Sosanya has developed a 3D weaver that created materials with high impact resistance and auxetic properties. As proof-of-concept, Sosanya has used his weaver’s output as soles of shoes.


Despite the familiar 3D quality, printing and weaving have distinctly different approaches. Weaving shares a deeper connection with fashion. It is manufactured in a loom and requires the repetitive intertwining of thread, not different from manufacturing traditional textile. Printing, on the other hand, is more industrial in the melting of the raw material and the mechanical whir of layer-by-layer printing.

The future of 3D printing in fashion are fueled by obvious benefits: bespoke shapes, ease of manufacturing and range. But alongside it is 3D weaving, a more complex process, but with a lot of interesting characteristics like auxetic-ness, texture, and varying strength that all function while keeping the fundamental form of thread intact.


  • 11 AUGUST 2015



Vinay Pathak learnt art of weaving for ‘Gour Hari Dastaan’


vinay-pathak-759Is this about weaving – not really – but it struck me as a nice little filler whilst I’m busy reorganising myself, the blog, and Julz Craft Supplies – smile

For regular ebayers, please note that I am changing around my ebay accounts.  I have been selling most of the craft supplies on my JULZWEAVING ACCOUNT, which has been really busy – BUT – it is a private sellers account and I have a limit on the number of items I can sell, and have had to keep juggling the numbers every month.

My long standing Business account with ebay was called 85solway, and I didn’t realise I could change the name, so I have been selling, fabric, giftware and odds and ends there.  HOWEVER I did a bit of research and it took me only two minutes to change the name to JULZCRAFTSUPPLIES!  

So, I am gradually moving items over there, where I can list as much as I want – I just have to pay for the listings, instead of getting most of them free!  I have been wondering whether to make another major change and  open an ebay shop – but I think I’ll take it one step at a time!

Back to the subject of this blog – hope my Indian readers appreciate this – hope the film is good – smile…..

Actor Vinay Pathak was made to learn the art of weaving for his role in “Gour Hari Dastaan: The Freedom File”.

copied from The Indian Express

By: IANS | Mumbai | Published:August 5, 2015 5:12 pm – See more at:

Vinay Pathak, Vinay Pathak news, Vinay Pathak films, Vinay Pathak shows, Vinay Pathak gour hari dastaan

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The film, which also features actors Konkona Sen Sharma, Ranvir Shorey and Tanisshtha Chatterjee, will release on August 14 — a day before the country’s Independence Day.

Actor Vinay Pathak was made to learn the art of weaving for his role in “Gour Hari Dastaan: The Freedom File”.

As part of his preparation for the film, director Ananth Mahadevan made the actor learn how to weave cloth. And Vinay learnt it from Oriya freedom fighter Gour Hari Das, on whose life story the film is based.

Das had learnt the art during the country’s freedom struggle. “I learnt the art of weaving during my movie filming for ‘Gour Hari Dastaan’. I had never thought that Ananth will make me weave as a part of role preparation,” Vinay said in a statement. “Special ‘charkhas’ from Sabarmati were called for this. I was more surprised on the teacher as it was none other than Das-ji. He learnt this art during the time of the independence struggle. He really showed patience and taught me this well,” added the actor. The film, which also features actors Konkona Sen Sharma, Ranvir Shorey and Tanisshtha Chatterjee, will release on August 14 — a day before the country’s Independence Day.

In The Summertime – Mungo Jerry – 1970


Just thought you might enjoy this – it’s from “the spare”, my other blog – smile

the spare

Its the season of Summer – the solstice was yesterday – and the summer festivals – especially Glastonbury – are about to start!

Oh I remember, I remember, being young and in love and dancing to “In the Summertime” in a crowded sunny field somewhere in 1970!

So let’s have a bit more of that nostalgia – smile – you can dance along too if you feel like it!

The lyrics – below – would not pass the “thought police” these days – but here they are!

In The Summertime

written by Ray Dorset

Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh, uh
Chh chh-chh, uh, Chh chh-chh

In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky
When the weather’s…

View original post 190 more words

Make An Upcycled Napkin Curtain – copied from Etsy



Laura Fenton is a New York City-based writer and editor whose work has appeared in many publications, including Country LivingGood HousekeepingKinfolk and Parents. She is also the author of The Little House In The City.

After living for years in a top-floor apartment where curtains were unnecessary, I recently landed in a ground-floor unit that, despite its many selling points, happens to look directly into my new neighbors’ windows. Suddenly, attractive window coverings became a high priority — but one that, I quickly learned, cost a pretty penny. Instead of investing in off-the-shelf window dressings, I decided to make my own from an excess of beloved but rarely-used vintage napkins, amassed over a decade of digging in flea markets and secondhand shops. With a little bit of stitching, my incomplete and mismatched sets of dinner napkins became a charming patchwork curtain that’s sheer enough to let in lots of natural light, while still affording (priceless!) privacy.

To make your own, you’ll need a stash of napkins (tea towels and other vintage linens will work, too), a sewing machine, a few basic craft supplies, and the Tetris-like skills to piece your design together. Here’s how.


You will need: 

  • Napkins
  • Iron
  • Straight pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon
  • Measuring Tape


First, launder and dry your napkins. Then, rough out your curtain design by positioning the napkins in a pattern on the floor or across a large work surface. Make sure you have enough pieces to create a varied patchwork; when you reach an arrangement you like, snap a pic to refer to as you sew — or better yet, leave the napkins laid out as they are.


Iron napkins to remove any creases (and make them easier to pin and sew).


Begin pinning napkins together with straight pins, starting with the napkins in the center. Rather than lining up their edges precisely, you’ll want the napkins to overlap each other slightly, as shown.


Use a zigzag stitch to sew along the overlapped edges. The zigzag stitch will add extra visual interest to the curtain (and it’s also a forgiving stitch for less-than-professional seamstresses). After you complete the center section, pin a few more loose napkins from your laid-out design to the edges of the sewn pieces and use the zigzag stitch to secure. Keep sewing and pinning until you have created one full curtain panel.

Tip: If your napkins don’t create a perfect rectangle, you may need to trim some of the perimeter napkins. (Just be sure to leave a bit of seam allowance so that you can still hem those cut edges.)


Next, cut several 20-inch pieces of ribbon to act as curtain ties. (Ties should be spaced about five to seven inches apart. We used nine ties for our 48-inch wide panel; measure to determine how many you will need.)


Fold each piece of ribbon in half, measure to determine to its position at the top of the panel, and pin to the back side of the curtain.


Next, sew one continuous zigzag stitch across the top hem of the curtain panel and each of the ribbon ties. Use the ties to hang the panel from your curtain rod.


Photos and styling by Laura Fenton.

A Gallery of Your Work ….31 May



scarfcopysThe Gallery

This is the Gallery of Your Work as it stands at the end of May 2015.

Are you shy, or haven’t got around to sending your work in, or just don’t trust me????

I really, really want this blog to be interactive and a place where you can go to get some ideas and inspiration!  I’m always offering to showcase your craft work – smile – either as individual “Show & Tells”, re-blogs, or to author an information sheet.

This was my invitation to contribute your work to this Gallery of Your Work.

And here are the 6 contributions – one of which is mine!

The text explaining who made the item and any details about it is accessed by hovering over the picture – to see the picture in larger definition, please click on it, and you will get a slide show.  The full text will be easily read, and you can even leave comments on any picture, for the maker!

Having taken inspiration from a fellow blogger, who put up a poll to ask people what design of crochet table runner she should make – smile – see here ……I thought I’d put up a poll to ask you to let me know whether you think I should extend this gallery idea or not!

Please tick to tell me what you think on the poll at the end of the gallery!

If you would still like to contribute to this Gallery – I will keep it open for longer – so you can still send your work in!  You can send me an email, or if you don’t have my email address, please fill in the Contact Me Form, and I will reply by email so that you can attach a picture.

3 June Update – one new submission – so I’m adding it here for now!  The response from the Poll gives me hope that there will be some more coming in – so please do continue to send me your photos.

I think what I’ll do is keep adding the pictures as they come in, and at some point – will renew this listing as the First Gallery of Your Work – so that the new photos get a chance to be in the most recent blog spot.  And then hopefully have Second & Third Galleries etc, as an ongoing theme – so – keep it in mind!  Your photos will always be welcome – smile!

9 June Update   – a beautiful dress made by Val one of my UK customers


This is the poll I mentioned above – 

I’ve never run one of these before so if I have got the questions wrong or anything else wrong – my apologies in advance!  The Poll lasts a week, so please do click on your preferred answer, and you will also be able to see what answers others have given as the week goes along.  Thinks – hope someone actually does use it!

Please also add any comments, or thoughts about the Gallery, that don’t fit into the set answers, in the comment section below – Many thanks – your feedback is appreciated!