Category Archives: textile art

Branch Weaving – on a Stick!

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There are various ways of weaving with sticks, and you can get as creative as you like! This is just one of them, and if you have a look at Pinterest you can find all kinds weaving ideas.

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Now that I’ve got started blogging again, I thought I’d share with you a post I found on Interweave the other day, just cos it looks fun, and something that you might like to try with the kids during the summer holiday.

And thanks to everyone who has been reading my blog or referencing my Information Sheets over the last couple of years – its amazing how the stats have climbed even tho I wasn’t looking!

How to Weave on a Stick with Branch Weaving

See here for the original article by Jenna Fear.

Even the most inexperienced weaver (me) can learn branch weaving! The resources to do so are inexpensive and found almost anywhere. All you need to dive into branch weaving is a Y-shaped stick, yarn, and possibly a fork or darning needle. The fork and needle aren’t necessary but could make the process a bit easier.

All I needed to create my woven branch: several balls of yarn, a branch, a fork, and scissors.

I found out about branch weaving when looking at weaving projects on Pinterest. Then I looked around the web to see how to make my own. These are the steps I followed:

1. Find your branch!
Take a nice little hike through a woody area or even just your own back yard. Maybe ask your dog to help. Find a Y-shaped branch with a fork wide enough to fit some weaving between. I would recommend one that is 1 to 2 feet in length.

2. Gather your yarn.
I would suggest using a few different colors, but you can use any kind of yarn. I just pulled a few yarn balls from my stash that I hadn’t earmarked for any projects.

3. Warp your branch.
This was the hardest part for me to get right. First, tie your yarn onto the bottom leg of the Y. Next, wrap the yarn once around that leg, then carry the yarn across the open space to the top leg. Wrap the top leg twice, then carry yarn back to the bottom leg, where you’ll wrap once again. Keep going like this: always wrap once around the bottom leg and twice around the top leg. Leave spaces between each strand of yarn so you’ve got space to weave in weft. You will have a 2-sided warp, and you can choose to weave on one side or both.

I warped my final project with gray yarn that was hard to see against the stick, so here is a warp I did with lighter yarn.

4. Begin weaving!
Pick the yarn color you’d like for your first row and tie it onto the yarn strand at the open end of the warp. Weave your yarn through the warp in an over-under-over-under pattern until you’re happy with the look. To finish with that color, weave to the end of the warp and then cut it, leaving a 2″ tail. Secure the tail to an end strand of the warp with a knot—you’ll weave that tail into the piece at the end. For now, the knot will keep your weaving from unweaving. Use to fork to press the yarn together after it’s woven to avoid any open spaces.

This is the simple over-under pattern I used to weave onto the branch.

Repeat this process as you switch yarn colors. For more intricate designs, switch up the weaving pattern. I was happy with my simple rows of color and not yet experienced enough in weaving to get too fancy.

5. Weave in the tails
Weave in the tails between rows of yarn just as you wove the rest of the yarn in an over-under pattern. Make sure the end of the yarn goes over the warp so the very end of the tail is only visible from the back.

When you’re finished with your branch weaving, hang it on the wall or put it on a table for colorful décor. It’s sure to be a conversation starter! Plus, it’s a fun project for anyone interested in nature and creating with their hands! Try it with kids to get them into weaving.

 

Make Your Own Silk Paper – The Ironing Method

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DSCF1868Its actually very easy to make paper out of silk, and you can get some beautiful results very quickly if you use the Ironing Method.

I tried out a few variations, and made a few mistakes, and I would suggest that you work on the trial and error method too, and work out what you prefer.

There are various uses for this handmade silk paper, and you can make is as thin or thick as you like.  Thick paper can be used for book covers and even writing paper, and can be painted or embellished and embroidered after its dry, and cut to any size you want.

The thin paper is great to add to any art textile design piece, and is especially dramatic as a window within a greetings card.   You can also make beads by rolling strips of the paper and varnishing them – so I hope this gives you some ideas for xmas gifts!

You will need:

IMG_2605silk cocoon strippings (unwashed and still containing the natural gum, that the silkworms used to make the cocoons, which is what makes this method possible)

and/or

 

throwsters wastesilk throwsters waste (again unwashed – this comes in white or various colours)

 

 

silk hankies

matawa silk hankies (these are unwrapped cocoons spread out into hemmed squares – see my post on silk worms)

other odds and ends to add in when you are making the paper, such as bits of silk carrier rods, cut silk fibres, pieces of silk lap, washed throwsters waste, glitter, small beads or anything else that takes your fancy!

an iron and board or table

non stick greaseproof baking paper – must be non stick otherwise you won’t be able to peel the paper off

small spray bottle filled with ordinary water

A4 pack with everything you need - £9.99

A4 pack with everything you need – £9.99

I have put together a pack with the basics for you…depending of what size you make, it should be enough for 5- 20 pieces.

You can either buy this direct – see here – or you can find the listings for it on etsy – here, and on ebay – here.A6 silk sample pack_Fotor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instructions:

DSCF1844Cut two pieces of the baking paper and lay one on your ironing surface, then pull out strands of the silk cocoon strippings and lay in a thin rough circle or square on top of the baking paper.

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1847Then spray with water and place the other sheet of baking paper on top and iron the sandwich.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1845Lift the top paper and add some more silk strippings, and repeat as above.  You can continue this process until you get the thickness you want – or you can …..

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1866….. add one thin silk hankie on top of the ironed silk, then another thin layer of the silk strippings, spray and iron.  The silk hankie does not contain gum so you need to add the strippings to fuse them.

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1868

The idea of using the silk hankie is to give a thin net that will allow you to keep some gaps in the finished paper.  Lift the piece up and see if you want to add some more silk strippings.  The paper will still be wet so work carefully.

 

 

 

 

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Once you are happy with the piece of paper you have made, pull it off the bottom baking sheet and allow to dry.  You will find you have made a very thin sheet of stable paper.  The edges of the hankie will need to be cut off, as they will probably not have been stabilised.

Please note, when experimenting, you need to balance the thicknesses on each side of the hankie, and if you decide to add another one, you can.  Silk hankies can be dyed before you use them and will add some lovely colours to your paper.

 

DSCF1854You don’t need to use the silk hankies – this is another version where I tried adding some white silk throwsters waste, a little washed dyed silk throwsters waste and some coloured glitter.

 

 

 

 

DSCF1860I wasn’t sure I liked it all that much, but its just to give you some ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is the finished dried piece.  Its a lot thicker than the first piece, and you need to fill all the gaps before you dry it!

 

If you would like to share your pictures of the paper you make, I will be happy to put them up on another post so that others can see them and get inspiration!  Please email them to me referencing “the ironing method’.  If you don’t have my email address, please use the CONTACT ME page.

 

To make things a bit clearer, you might like to watch this video I found on U-tube!

Christmas Fabrics are now in stock and listed on ebay & etsy

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Harking back to my post of 21 August when I first mentioned the word CHRISTMAS for the first time this year – I have now taken delivery of the first orders of all the Christmas & Seasonal Fabrics I chose with great care – smile!

Christmas is still a good couple of months away, and altho’ thank goodness, the hype hasn’t yet started on the media, as at least some of you will be thinking of making your own personally styled gifts,  this is the time to start planning what you want to make.

I hope what I have chosen suits your tastes as well as mine!

So this is the range – they are all 100% cotton, some are a little wider than the general 45″/110 cm, and they are available by the metre, half metre and fat quarters.  I have also created a special variation to allow you to get a 6″ strip of the full width to use as a matching embellishment for say, christmas stockings, and other small gifts.

You can find them, and the quilting kits below, in the fabrics section of my etsy shop – HERE, and the fabrics section of julzcraftsupplies on ebay – HERE.

Also new in are three designs of these quality quilting kits – buy them to make yourself – or give as gifts!

3 popular quilting kits

3 popular quilting kits

and now – for something new – 3D Weaving!

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I came upon this today – scary isn’t it !

New Technology is replacing us weavers ……

 

Unlike 3D Printing, 3D Weaving Uses

Old Techniques for Futuristic Forms

Designer Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu shows off an emerging method of clothes-weaving that overcomes 3D printing in range of texture and thread integrity

Designer Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu shows off an emerging method of clothes-weaving that overcomes 3D printing in range of texture and thread integrity

Jim Chen-Hsiang Hu’s graduation collection at Central St. Martins takes a close look at fashion’s most basic element, thread, and turns it into a malleable material with height, width and depth. Unlike in 3D printed clothing, Chen-Hsiang Hu’s collection moves into 3D territory without a clear jump off point.

On his website, he describes his creativity as “Dedicated to design and techno development.” His “Xi” collection pieces were all done in red, with laser-cut fabric that blend naturally into shapes that extend the human form. The cut-outs of the flat fabrics seem to predate the 3D forms, forming dark shadows that accentuate the protrusions. The designer won the L’Oreal Young Talent Award for his work on 3D weaving.

3D weaving is a minority in the world dominated by additive manufacturing. Instead of working on a shape layer-by-layer, 3D weaving requires special looms (Chen-Hsiang Hu used a bespoke one) and the shapes are built axis by axis. His collection was made with a combination of thread and resin.

However, automation in the complicated process isn’t impossible. Oluwaseyi Sosanya has developed a 3D weaver that created materials with high impact resistance and auxetic properties. As proof-of-concept, Sosanya has used his weaver’s output as soles of shoes.

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Despite the familiar 3D quality, printing and weaving have distinctly different approaches. Weaving shares a deeper connection with fashion. It is manufactured in a loom and requires the repetitive intertwining of thread, not different from manufacturing traditional textile. Printing, on the other hand, is more industrial in the melting of the raw material and the mechanical whir of layer-by-layer printing.

The future of 3D printing in fashion are fueled by obvious benefits: bespoke shapes, ease of manufacturing and range. But alongside it is 3D weaving, a more complex process, but with a lot of interesting characteristics like auxetic-ness, texture, and varying strength that all function while keeping the fundamental form of thread intact.

 

  • 11 AUGUST 2015

source: http://www.psfk.com/2015/08/3d-weaving-versus-3d-printing-chen-hsiang-hu.html

 

Some thoughts on “A Gallery of Your Work”

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This is a follow up to the GALLERY OF YOUR WORK, that appeared on 31 May 2015.

this beautiful summer dress was made for Val's holiday - we had a bit of a panic, because it seems Royal Mail lost her package - so I sent her another 4m of this very popular red poppy material - listed in julzcrafts supplies shop on etsy - and on the 85solway account on ebay.

this beautiful summer dress was made for Val’s holiday – we had a bit of a panic, because it seems Royal Mail lost her package – so I sent her another 4m of this very popular red poppy material – listed in julzcrafts supplies shop on etsy – and on the 85solway account on ebay.

I have just updated it to include this lovely dress that a customer of mine made out of one of the fabrics that I sell.

This was the first GALLERY  that I have tried putting together, and it has given rise to various comments from readers, and the information from the POLL I put up, has been useful.

I have been mulling over the idea, and the problems with it – smile.

It takes quite a lot for people to send it photos of their work, and actually, I am as shy about showing some of mine, especially when I don’t think I’ve got it quite right!  I’m not sure I would immediately think – oh what a great idea, I’ll send a picture to this blog – and if I didn’t know the writer – I’d be uncertain about how they would use the pictures.

So, let me try and reassure you – smile.

My intentions are nothing but honourable!

The idea was simply to give people a place to showcase their work, to give encouragement and to perhaps inspire others.  You see a great idea and it creates a spark that leads to you using some element of it to improve the work you do yourself.  It may not even be in the same medium, or directly comparable!

Now, a long time ago, I briefly started degree in Photography – this was after I had already been working as a Photographer for quite a while, and had initially trained with a quite well known commercial advertising photographer in London, so I was a mature student, and joined to see if I could improve my work – and well, to be honest, to get my hands on the large format cameras the college had, which I couldn’t afford!

Not for the first time I was subjected, along with the others on the course, to the vicious system of ‘crits’ – supposedly creative criticism of your work by the tutors.  With everyone else standing by and watching, and waiting for their turn.

I don’t know why these supposed ‘teachers’ thought it was fun to rip people’s work apart – the same happens in art colleges and other creative courses.  At best it might give you some idea of how others view what you have done – at worst – it totally destroys your enthusiasm for the subject!  Makes you feel worthless, and want to give up – even if you are incredibly talented!  And all abilities should be nurtured and encouraged by tutors – that’s what their job is supposed to be about.

this is a standard advertising still life I took years ago!

this is a standard advertising still life I took years ago!

Well I might not have been the best photographer around, but I knew that the course wasn’t going to give me what I wanted after the first term – so I left!  (OK – the courses were free at the time and I didn’t need the degree.)

The point is – besides me having a chance to show off some of my old work – smile – (you can see a selection of some of my other photos on “the spare“)

– that, if you were subjected to that kind of criticism in the past, you probably don’t want to put up a photo on a GALLERY HERE!

On the other hand, if you want to promote the work you sell, you might well be interested in getting some FREE PUBLICITY!

But the idea of the Gallery is not just for those few who, rightly, take any opportunity to publicise their work – it is for EVERYONE!

I am just as interested in seeing your first attempt at something, with all its faults, as the work with the professional finish that comes with years of experience.

You may find that someone who sees it can help you out with any problems you are having – and certainly, anyone who puts up their work here is not going to get ‘pulled to pieces’ – I moderate all comments, and will not allow any nasty ones to see the light of day!

It also seems that I have not made myself clear enough about what kind of work I will put up in a GALLERY.

THE ONLY STIPULATION IS THAT IT IS CRAFT RELATED – ANY CRAFT –

IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A TEXTILE CRAFT.

There are too many crafts to mention, but I will mention a few, just to make it obvious – there’s pottery, sculpture, glass work, ironwork, jewellery work, leatherwork, paperwork (not your accounts tho – smile), woodwork, re-cycling projects, mixed media etc etc – and of course anything to do with fabric, fibres and yarns.

What doesn’t qualify as a craft for the purposes of this exercise, is art work as in paintings etc (there are plenty of other places to show those) and videos – simply because they take up too much of my storage allowance!

And talking about storage space – please just send in ONE PHOT0. 

If you do send in more, I can, if I think it will show your work better, create a grid to put the other shots into the format of one image.  If you are not sure which photo will be best, you can send in more and let me choose which one to use.

THE PHOTOGRAPH CAN BE OF WORK YOU HAVE DONE IN THE PAST OR JUST RECENTLY.

NB:  If you would like to be featured in a SHOW & TELL you can send in as many photos as you like!

If you look at the bottom of the current GALLERY OF YOUR WORK, you will see that there is a note about copyright.  You own the copyright of the work and the photograph.  By sending the picture to me, you are only allowing me to use it in the Gallery, and I will ask your permission if I want to use it in any other way – as should anyone else that sees the blog – I strongly disagree with the idea of ‘stealing someone else’s work’.  However, it happens, so please don’t blame me if your picture appears elsewhere.  See my copyright info at the end of the blogroll on the right hand side of this page – and all pages!

this useful widget at the end of the said blogroll shows where the viewers come from

this useful widget at the end of the said blogroll shows where the viewers come from

The joy of the internet is that people from all over the world can see this blog and do! – I just took a snapshot of the latest figures for this blog – the widget here tells me where you all come from – and if you click on the actual widget at the end of my blogroll – you can see the that you are a truly INTERNATIONAL lot!

So – of course – the offer to host a picture of your work is open to anyone who reads this blog, or is a customer of mine and doesn’t bother to read it (smile), all over the world.

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS IDEA?

How about I keep this GALLERY IDEA GOING?

I am thinking about having constant open submission, without any deadlines.

(Open submission means that anyone can send in a photo of their work – and anything you send in gets published, unless we have agreed that this photo is not suitable for any reason)

However, the current gallery is now closedBUT as soon as I have at least 10 photos waiting to be published, I will create a new gallery and then the next set of photos will form the basis of the next gallery – with any luck this could run & run!

Your comments & ‘likes’ would be greatly appreciated – I am not on twitter or facebook, but would be happy if you would spread the word for me!  I will direct my mailing list of customers – who are several hundred in number – to this blog in my next “newz from julz” – so hopefully we will find that there are enough people interested in this idea to start the ball rolling!

(If you would like to join the mailing list – please fill in the form at the bottom of the SHOP TALK PAGE)

I LOOK FORWARD TO RECEIVING YOUR PICTURES!

If you don’t have my email address – I took it off the site because I was getting too much spam – please either fill in the form on the SHOP TALK PAGE or the one on the CONTACT ME PAGE – and I will reply to your email address so that you can send me some pictures!

THANKS

julz signature

A Gallery of Your Work ….31 May

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scarfcopysThe Gallery

This is the Gallery of Your Work as it stands at the end of May 2015.

Are you shy, or haven’t got around to sending your work in, or just don’t trust me????

I really, really want this blog to be interactive and a place where you can go to get some ideas and inspiration!  I’m always offering to showcase your craft work – smile – either as individual “Show & Tells”, re-blogs, or to author an information sheet.

This was my invitation to contribute your work to this Gallery of Your Work.

And here are the 6 contributions – one of which is mine!

The text explaining who made the item and any details about it is accessed by hovering over the picture – to see the picture in larger definition, please click on it, and you will get a slide show.  The full text will be easily read, and you can even leave comments on any picture, for the maker!

Having taken inspiration from a fellow blogger, who put up a poll to ask people what design of crochet table runner she should make – smile – see here ……I thought I’d put up a poll to ask you to let me know whether you think I should extend this gallery idea or not!

Please tick to tell me what you think on the poll at the end of the gallery!

If you would still like to contribute to this Gallery – I will keep it open for longer – so you can still send your work in!  You can send me an email, or if you don’t have my email address, please fill in the Contact Me Form, and I will reply by email so that you can attach a picture.

3 June Update – one new submission – so I’m adding it here for now!  The response from the Poll gives me hope that there will be some more coming in – so please do continue to send me your photos.

I think what I’ll do is keep adding the pictures as they come in, and at some point – will renew this listing as the First Gallery of Your Work – so that the new photos get a chance to be in the most recent blog spot.  And then hopefully have Second & Third Galleries etc, as an ongoing theme – so – keep it in mind!  Your photos will always be welcome – smile!

9 June Update   – a beautiful dress made by Val one of my UK customers

 

This is the poll I mentioned above – 

I’ve never run one of these before so if I have got the questions wrong or anything else wrong – my apologies in advance!  The Poll lasts a week, so please do click on your preferred answer, and you will also be able to see what answers others have given as the week goes along.  Thinks – hope someone actually does use it!

Please also add any comments, or thoughts about the Gallery, that don’t fit into the set answers, in the comment section below – Many thanks – your feedback is appreciated!

 

 

NB: COPYRIGHT OF THESE PHOTOS IS OWNED AND RETAINED BY THE MAKER OF THE ITEM SHOWN – PLEASE SEE MY STANDARD NOTICE ABOUT COPYRIGHT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BLOGROLL AT THE RIGHT OF THIS PAGE.  DO NOT REPRODUCE WITHOUT PERMISSION!
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