Category Archives: textile art

The Free Postage Offer on etsy ends on 20 October – don’t miss out!

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Just a quick reminder……

new etsy banner

Buy two or more items from my Etsy shop and pay NO postage!  

Click on this link to take you to the shop:

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/julzcraftsupplies?coupon=NEWZFROMJULZOFFER

Your free postage will be applied automatically at checkout.  If you get to my shop by any other route, there is a box for the coupon code – please enter NEWZFROMJULZOFFER in the box to get your free postage.  I am offering this discount to all international customers as well as UK customers.

This coupon is valid from Friday 6 October to Friday 20 October only.

For more information, please see my earlier post HERE

Make your own Silk Paper – the Ironing Method

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handmade silk paper – probably made by the wet method

There are two basic ways to make silk paper, the wet method and the ironing method.  The wet method involves soaking all your ingredients in a ‘bath’, and dipping a framed gauze grid into it, which you allow to dry into a sheet of paper.  This method is the ‘usual’ way to make all handmade paper, often from cotton rags or recycled paper strips.

The ironing method is for gummed silk only – the natural gum in unwashed silk fibres, bonds the fibres together, when sprayed with water and then heated with an ordinary iron.

I wrote the tutorial below a couple of years ago, and am copying it here again, because some of you might like to try it out – and if you give it a try now, you’ll probably find that you get hooked, and can make some lovely gift items in time for Christmas.

Of course the other reason I’m repeating it, is that I have put together a pack of all the fibres you will need to try this method out – available for sale on both ebay & etsy – £9.99. (If you buy from etsy – see my special offer for free postage HERE.). I’ll be listing the individual silk fibres as well in the next few days, so that you can choose which ones you want to use, without buying the kit.

A4 silk ironing pack_Fotor

A4 pack with everything you need – £9.99

My first attempts are recorded in this tutorial, and I have to say, that they aren’t all that special – hopefully,  I will get better at it, now I have a proper work table, and can have another try!

Please do send me pictures of your own attempts – it would be great to see them, and when I have enough from more than three or four of my customers, I’ll put them all up in another blog post, so that we can all learn from each other – smile.

I also intend to put up another blog with a tutorial on the wet method of making silk paper – so do check back here – or even better, why don’t you sign up to follow this blog! (see the options in the column on the right of this text – if you are viewing this on your phone, you may not be able to see it without some adjustments- smile)

Make Your Own Silk Paper – The Ironing Method

DSCF1868Its actually very easy to make paper out of silk, and you can get some beautiful results very quickly if you use the Ironing Method.

I tried out a few variations, and made a few mistakes, and I would suggest that you work on the trial and error method too, and work out what you prefer.

There are various uses for this handmade silk paper, and you can make is as thin or thick as you like.  Thick paper can be used for book covers and even writing paper, and can be painted or embellished and embroidered after its dry, and cut to any size you want.

The thin paper is great to add to any art textile design piece, and is especially dramatic as a window within a greetings card.   You can also make beads by rolling strips of the paper and varnishing them – so I hope this gives you some ideas for xmas gifts!

You will need:

IMG_2605silk cocoon strippings (unwashed and still containing the natural gum, that the silkworms used to make the cocoons, which is what makes this method possible)

and/or

 

throwsters wastesilk throwsters waste (again unwashed – this comes in white or various colours)

 

 

silk hankies

matawa silk hankies (these are unwrapped cocoons spread out into hemmed squares – see my post on silk worms)

other odds and ends to add in when you are making the paper, such as bits of silk carrier rods, cut silk fibres, pieces of silk lap, washed throwsters waste, glitter, small beads or anything else that takes your fancy!

an iron and board or table

non stick greaseproof baking paper – must be non stick otherwise you won’t be able to peel the paper off

small spray bottle filled with ordinary water

I have put together a pack with the basics for you…depending of what size you make, it should be enough for 5- 10 pieces. See above for how to buy it!

 

Instructions:

DSCF1844Cut two pieces of the baking paper and lay one on your ironing surface, then pull out strands of the silk cocoon strippings and lay in a thin rough circle or square on top of the baking paper.

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1847Then spray with water and place the other sheet of baking paper on top and iron the sandwich.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1845Lift the top paper and add some more silk strippings, and repeat as above.  You can continue this process until you get the thickness you want – or you can …..

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1866….. add one thin silk hankie on top of the ironed silk, then another thin layer of the silk strippings, spray and iron.  The silk hankie does not contain gum so you need to add the strippings to fuse them.

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1868

The idea of using the silk hankie is to give a thin net that will allow you to keep some gaps in the finished paper.  Lift the piece up and see if you want to add some more silk strippings.  The paper will still be wet so work carefully.

 

 

 

 

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Once you are happy with the piece of paper you have made, pull it off the bottom baking sheet and allow to dry.  You will find you have made a very thin sheet of stable paper.  The edges of the hankie will need to be cut off, as they will probably not have been stabilised.

Please note, when experimenting, you need to balance the thicknesses on each side of the hankie, and if you decide to add another one, you can.  Silk hankies can be dyed before you use them and will add some lovely colours to your paper.

 

DSCF1854You don’t need to use the silk hankies – this is another version where I tried adding some white silk throwsters waste, a little washed dyed silk throwsters waste and some coloured glitter.

 

 

 

 

DSCF1860I wasn’t sure I liked it all that much, but its just to give you some ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSCF1878

 

 

This is the finished dried piece.  Its a lot thicker than the first piece, and you need to fill all the gaps before you dry it!

 

If you would like to share your pictures of the paper you make, I will be happy to put them up on another post so that others can see them and get inspiration!  Please email them to me referencing “the ironing method’.  If you don’t have my email address, please use the CONTACT ME page.

 

To make things a bit clearer, you might like to watch this video I found on U-tube!

A Special Offer for all my readers ……

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Etsy have started a new ‘coupon’ scheme, so I thought I’d try it!

This banner is what you will see when you go to my Etsy Shop:
julz craft supplies

Lampeter, Wales 565 Sales On Etsy since 2012   Favourite shop (458)  5 out of 5 stars        

The Special Offer is –

Buy two or more items from my Etsy shop and pay NO postage!    

Click on this link to take you to the shop:

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/julzcraftsupplies?coupon=NEWZFROMJULZOFFER

This coupon is valid from Friday 6 October to Friday 20 October only.

Update 9 October:  I have now checked with etsy about how their coupon works – if you click the link to get to my shop, your free postage will be applied automatically at checkout.  If you get to my shop by any other route, there is a box for the coupon code – please enter NEWZFROMJULZOFFER in the box to get your free postage.  I am offering this discount to all international customers as well as UK customers.

 

cropped-3vert-dry-stone-wall-version-2.jpgNB:  You will have to register with etsy if you have never been there before, to take advantage of this offer, which I am also emailing to the customers on my mailing list as a NEWZ FROM JULZ.  

However, anyone can access my shop without registering, and if you would like to order without going thro’ etsy – you can just send me an order and I will give you the same deal.
Please see the buying direct page.

BELOW ARE A FEW EXAMPLES OF WHAT YOU CAN FIND THERE

 so far I have approx 50 different items listed.

A4 Pack of SILK FIBRES for making your own Silk Paper, using the Ironing Method - with link to instructions on julzcrafts.com
A4 Pack of SILK FIBRES for making your own Silk Paper, using the Ironing Method – with link to instructions on julzcrafts.com – All you need to make silk paper – including gummed cocoon strippings, throwsters waste, silk hankies and a few other fibres to get you started.
£9.99
50 gm Pack of White MULBERRY SILK HANKIES For Spinning, Felting, Paper Making  & Scrapbooking- approx 26 cm square
50 gm Pack of White MULBERRY SILK HANKIES For Spinning, Felting, Paper Making & Scrapbooking- approx 26 cm square
£6.99.  There is a separate listing for a small sample: £3.99
6 x 4.5 inch piece of Luxurious Mixed PINK/Green SILK LAP - can be used for Quilting , Spinning, Felting, Fibre Arts & Paper Making
6 x 4.5 inch piece of Luxurious Mixed PINK/Green SILK LAP – can be used for Quilting , Spinning, Felting, Fibre Arts & Paper Making
£8.99.  There is a range of colours also listed.
IRON ON Personalised Garment LABELS - 4 designs, for your handmade clothes and gifts - pack of 4 (2nd listing) - Free Worldwide Postage
IRON ON Personalised Garment LABELS – 4 designs, for your handmade clothes and gifts – pack of 4 (2nd listing)  There are 8 designs in total to choose from.
£4.50
100 gm cones pure MULBERRY SILK - BLACK Flecked with multicoloured cotton neps -2 thicknesses warp & weft yarn for weaving knitting crochet
100 gm cones pure MULBERRY SILK – BLACK Flecked with multicoloured cotton neps -2 thicknesses warp & weft yarn for weaving knitting crochet
£9.99
200 gm Pure COTTON WARPING Yarn, light cream, for Weaving Warp & Weft , Knitting, Crochet, Macrame etc
200 gm Pure COTTON WARPING Yarn, light cream, for Weaving Warp & Weft , Knitting, Crochet, Macrame etc
£8.99
SALE PRICE: Miniature Rachel of Greenfield Quilt Kit - Spotty Hen 13in X 15in - Free UK Postage.
SALE PRICE: Miniature Rachel of Greenfield Quilt Kit – Spotty Hen 13in X 15in. There are 3 designs to choose from.
£23.99
Pair of Stainless Steel Spinners and Felters MINI CARDERS - great for blending small amounts of fibres, right size for CHILDREN'S hands
Pair of Stainless Steel Spinners and Felters MINI CARDERS – great for blending small amounts of fibres, right size for CHILDREN’S hands
£28.50
Luxury  WOODEN SOAP CUTTER - Allows you to vary the thickness of your slices - robustly made - should last for years
Luxury WOODEN SOAP CUTTER – Allows you to vary the thickness of your slices – robustly made – should last for years
£29.50
WOLF fabric PATCH Badge - iron or sew on your jeans,  jackets, caps
WOLF fabric PATCH Badge – iron or sew on your jeans, jackets, caps
£4.50. There are several other badges to choose from.

If you have been following this blog for the last couple of months,

you will know that I have moved recently, and have more stock to collect and list, when I can manage it, but what is listed on etsy is most of the stock I have here at the moment.  I still have those lovely fabrics and gift items, but – unfortunately, not here!

 I also sell on ebay, and there are a few of the same items listed there, as well as some other auction lots.  You are welcome to check them out HERE.  However the Special Offer does not apply to any purchases on ebay.

If you have problems getting your free postage on Etsy, please let me know.

I have never used their coupons before and I’m not sure how they work!
It does seem you have to arrive at julzcraftsupplies via this link.
I’m sure you will also want to browse the rest of the site, so if you want to return to my shop, please use the link again – or to just check stuff without accessing the
FREE POSTAGE OFFER
please type in julzcraftsupplies, in the search box.  Alternatively, just type in “julz” and you will see a list of other shops with julz in their name, and you will find me there – smile.
happy shopping

PS:  I seem to be having trouble with the spacing of this text – I’ve gone back and forth       adding extra lines between the paragraphs, but the system isn’t responding!

 

PS: Has anyone tried Branch Weaving?

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If you have, it would be great to see how you got on.

If you’d like to send me a photo, I will send you my email address if you use the contact me page, and as soon as I have enough, I’ll compile a new listing of them, and we can all share our ideas, and maybe put them in the ‘show & tell‘ archive!

I confess, I picked out a forked branch, but not got round to using it yet!

Please see my previous post – Branch Weaving with flowers

as well as the original tutorial for weaving on a branch

Kantha: Exhibition of Textiles of Bengal

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Mingei International Museum
Kantha: Recycled and Embroidered Textiles of Bengal
October 28, 2017– March 25, 2018
San Diego, California  Learn More

I came across this Exhibition, from one of the mailing lists I am on – yes, I’m still talking about mailing lists.

The image is very striking, and I’d never heard of Kantha before, so I looked up the link above, and this is how it described it.

This exhibition features approximately 40 kantha

from Mingei’s permanent collection.

Kantha is a term used across the Indian sub-continent to denote decorative stitched quilting. In Gujarat, hangings patterned with concentric circles or squares in running stitch are known as kanthas, while in Bengal, kanthas are stitched for a variety of purposes, such as winter quilts, covers and wraps for books and valuables or as mats for ceremonial purposes. They are most often given to daughters on the occasion of their marriage, as a token of love, or as a gift for a new-born child or grown son. They are often, as tradition has it, made up of old cast off saris or dhotis. They can be the work of two or more generations of women and are treasured as family heirlooms.

I’d love to go to the exhibition, but its in California – so if anyone does go there, especially if prompted by this blog, do let us know what you think of it!

COME TO THINK OF IT –
IF ANYONE WOULD LIKE TO WRITE A SHORT PIECE
ABOUT ANY CRAFT EVENT OR EXHIBITION THEY HAVE BEEN TO,
I’D BE HAPPY TO PUBLISH IT ON THIS BLOG FOR YOU!
ANY ONE, FROM ANYWHERE, ABOUT ANY EVENT THAT’S LINKED TO ANY CRAFT

 

DON’T BE SHY, IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A MASTERPIECE

BUT YOU DO NEED TO HAVE TAKEN SOME DECENT PHOTOS OF IT!

WHO’S GOING TO BE FIRST?  

PLEASE GO TO THE CONTACT ME PAGE AND SEND ME A MESSAGE!

LET’S SEE IF WE CAN GET THIS IDEA OFF THE GROUND!

Branch Weaving – on a Stick!

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There are various ways of weaving with sticks, and you can get as creative as you like! This is just one of them, and if you have a look at Pinterest you can find all kinds weaving ideas.

Río Petrohue 1.40 x 1.30.jpg

Now that I’ve got started blogging again, I thought I’d share with you a post I found on Interweave the other day, just cos it looks fun, and something that you might like to try with the kids during the summer holiday.

PS:  see also later post about another way to use Branch Weaving.

And thanks to everyone who has been reading my blog or referencing my Information Sheets over the last couple of years – its amazing how the stats have climbed even tho I wasn’t looking!

How to Weave on a Stick with Branch Weaving

See here for the original article by Jenna Fear.

Even the most inexperienced weaver (me) can learn branch weaving! The resources to do so are inexpensive and found almost anywhere. All you need to dive into branch weaving is a Y-shaped stick, yarn, and possibly a fork or darning needle. The fork and needle aren’t necessary but could make the process a bit easier.

All I needed to create my woven branch: several balls of yarn, a branch, a fork, and scissors.

I found out about branch weaving when looking at weaving projects on Pinterest. Then I looked around the web to see how to make my own. These are the steps I followed:

1. Find your branch!
Take a nice little hike through a woody area or even just your own back yard. Maybe ask your dog to help. Find a Y-shaped branch with a fork wide enough to fit some weaving between. I would recommend one that is 1 to 2 feet in length.

2. Gather your yarn.
I would suggest using a few different colors, but you can use any kind of yarn. I just pulled a few yarn balls from my stash that I hadn’t earmarked for any projects.

3. Warp your branch.
This was the hardest part for me to get right. First, tie your yarn onto the bottom leg of the Y. Next, wrap the yarn once around that leg, then carry the yarn across the open space to the top leg. Wrap the top leg twice, then carry yarn back to the bottom leg, where you’ll wrap once again. Keep going like this: always wrap once around the bottom leg and twice around the top leg. Leave spaces between each strand of yarn so you’ve got space to weave in weft. You will have a 2-sided warp, and you can choose to weave on one side or both.

I warped my final project with gray yarn that was hard to see against the stick, so here is a warp I did with lighter yarn.

4. Begin weaving!
Pick the yarn color you’d like for your first row and tie it onto the yarn strand at the open end of the warp. Weave your yarn through the warp in an over-under-over-under pattern until you’re happy with the look. To finish with that color, weave to the end of the warp and then cut it, leaving a 2″ tail. Secure the tail to an end strand of the warp with a knot—you’ll weave that tail into the piece at the end. For now, the knot will keep your weaving from unweaving. Use to fork to press the yarn together after it’s woven to avoid any open spaces.

This is the simple over-under pattern I used to weave onto the branch.

Repeat this process as you switch yarn colors. For more intricate designs, switch up the weaving pattern. I was happy with my simple rows of color and not yet experienced enough in weaving to get too fancy.

5. Weave in the tails
Weave in the tails between rows of yarn just as you wove the rest of the yarn in an over-under pattern. Make sure the end of the yarn goes over the warp so the very end of the tail is only visible from the back.

When you’re finished with your branch weaving, hang it on the wall or put it on a table for colorful décor. It’s sure to be a conversation starter! Plus, it’s a fun project for anyone interested in nature and creating with their hands! Try it with kids to get them into weaving.

 

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