Tag Archives: julz crafts

Branch Weaving – on a Stick!

Standard

There are various ways of weaving with sticks, and you can get as creative as you like! This is just one of them, and if you have a look at Pinterest you can find all kinds weaving ideas.

Río Petrohue 1.40 x 1.30.jpg

Now that I’ve got started blogging again, I thought I’d share with you a post I found on Interweave the other day, just cos it looks fun, and something that you might like to try with the kids during the summer holiday.

And thanks to everyone who has been reading my blog or referencing my Information Sheets over the last couple of years – its amazing how the stats have climbed even tho I wasn’t looking!

How to Weave on a Stick with Branch Weaving

See here for the original article by Jenna Fear.

Even the most inexperienced weaver (me) can learn branch weaving! The resources to do so are inexpensive and found almost anywhere. All you need to dive into branch weaving is a Y-shaped stick, yarn, and possibly a fork or darning needle. The fork and needle aren’t necessary but could make the process a bit easier.

All I needed to create my woven branch: several balls of yarn, a branch, a fork, and scissors.

I found out about branch weaving when looking at weaving projects on Pinterest. Then I looked around the web to see how to make my own. These are the steps I followed:

1. Find your branch!
Take a nice little hike through a woody area or even just your own back yard. Maybe ask your dog to help. Find a Y-shaped branch with a fork wide enough to fit some weaving between. I would recommend one that is 1 to 2 feet in length.

2. Gather your yarn.
I would suggest using a few different colors, but you can use any kind of yarn. I just pulled a few yarn balls from my stash that I hadn’t earmarked for any projects.

3. Warp your branch.
This was the hardest part for me to get right. First, tie your yarn onto the bottom leg of the Y. Next, wrap the yarn once around that leg, then carry the yarn across the open space to the top leg. Wrap the top leg twice, then carry yarn back to the bottom leg, where you’ll wrap once again. Keep going like this: always wrap once around the bottom leg and twice around the top leg. Leave spaces between each strand of yarn so you’ve got space to weave in weft. You will have a 2-sided warp, and you can choose to weave on one side or both.

I warped my final project with gray yarn that was hard to see against the stick, so here is a warp I did with lighter yarn.

4. Begin weaving!
Pick the yarn color you’d like for your first row and tie it onto the yarn strand at the open end of the warp. Weave your yarn through the warp in an over-under-over-under pattern until you’re happy with the look. To finish with that color, weave to the end of the warp and then cut it, leaving a 2″ tail. Secure the tail to an end strand of the warp with a knot—you’ll weave that tail into the piece at the end. For now, the knot will keep your weaving from unweaving. Use to fork to press the yarn together after it’s woven to avoid any open spaces.

This is the simple over-under pattern I used to weave onto the branch.

Repeat this process as you switch yarn colors. For more intricate designs, switch up the weaving pattern. I was happy with my simple rows of color and not yet experienced enough in weaving to get too fancy.

5. Weave in the tails
Weave in the tails between rows of yarn just as you wove the rest of the yarn in an over-under pattern. Make sure the end of the yarn goes over the warp so the very end of the tail is only visible from the back.

When you’re finished with your branch weaving, hang it on the wall or put it on a table for colorful décor. It’s sure to be a conversation starter! Plus, it’s a fun project for anyone interested in nature and creating with their hands! Try it with kids to get them into weaving.

 

HALLO AGAIN! – it’s been far too long!

Standard
a garden in benign neglect_Fotor

A Garden in Benign Neglect

Its been a long time since I last posted on this blog – a lot longer than I intended it to be.  I thought I was just going to take a short break from online selling, but as you can see it didn’t work out that way, and a few more changes came along too!

I did want to have some time to rethink the way I was working, because it wasn’t suiting me to be bound to the computer and the deadlines for posting out endless packages.  Don’t get me wrong, I still enjoyed it, but I missed the personal element.

For many years, before the internet came along, I sold face to face, at craft markets and other venues, and I knew who my customers were, what they wanted, what they were making, any problems they had etc – because they would tell me! – and I would learn techniques from them too.

I was missing that part of the process, but of course, I found that there are less of these events around now, simply because its possible to sell online.  And sad to say I have found that I can no longer do the driving to venues and packing and unpacking the stock that I used to take for granted, because I have osteoarthritis in both knees and find it too tiring to do many of these events these days!

Of course I can reach at lot more people online, in other countries as well as my own, without moving from my desk.  So whilst I hope to keep my hand in with some face to face selling, I think its time to get back to selling online again!

I have tried introducing as much interaction as possible with this blog, trying to include that person to person, if not face to face, feel by encouraging people to leave comments, and with invitations for everyone to share their work here – but I have to say, that it hasn’t worked all that well, because there is an issue of trust that is missing when you don’t know and can’t meet the person you are dealing with.

However I will be keeping the “SHOW & TELL” archive section, and will always be happy to put up pictures of your own work, whatever kind of craft you work in, and wherever you are!  And you are welcome to contact me with any queries, and to tell me what you are making and what items you might need, and I will see if I can source them for you.

The other major change – 

is that I have moved to a really nice little stone cottage, with a large garden – see photo above – which needs a lot of sorting out, in the Lampeter area of West Wales.

I have not got much storage space here, and am still waiting to find some builders who will allow me to make the changes I need – such as a safe staircase, some storage space and a bit of renovation work.  (If you know anyone in this area, please get it touch – its taking far too long to find a builder that doesn’t give a start date earlier than 6 months time!)

This means that a lot of my stock is inaccessible at the moment, so when I get going again soon, I will not be featuring my full stock – but if you have been a customer of mine in the past and want to order something that I sold before, please ask and I will tell if you I still have it, and whether I can access it!

I will be feeling my way as to how much I can list, on ebay and etsy, and may try and ring the changes in the way I work too.  ie:  If you list it, you have to be prepared to send the item immediately, so I may have some weeks off here and there and take all the listings down.  However, if you do want something specific when they are not listed, you are welcome to contact me via email, or the “contact me” box on this blog.

There are also a few new ideas popping into my head at the moment, that need a bit more research, and when I have done that, I’ll try them out and see whether they work – for you and for me – smile!

So watch this space, and I’ll let you know quite soon when the listings are up again.

All the best

julz signature

Aside

snippet heard on the Jeremy Vine Show (BBC Radio 2) whilst I was driving this afternoon ….not verbatim

“Well I’m a delivery driver, and we’ve got wi-fi in our

vehicles, so when I’m on a break I’m sitting in the van

designing websites for WordPress customers”

He went on to ask for tax advice and what he needed to declare as a small business.

7 Feb:  I’ve now had time to listen to the whole 2 hours of Thursday’s show on iplayer:

On Jeremy Vine today  subjects covered are FGM, Tesco’s supply chain, an interview with a German journalist who had access to ISIS, and nine to fivers, which is where the snippet above came from.  If you only want to listen to that its 1hr 36mins into the programme.

`

WordPress Travelling Salesman …..?

Mr Bewick’s Birdwatch

Standard

I am reblogging this post from the website of the Cambridge Library Collection – its a beautiful old book and I only found it because I was looking for a post to reblog as a challenge from the members of blogging101 January 2015 – this is the first time I’ve reblogged anything!

Cambridge Library Collection Blog

9781108065405fc3dIt was the RSPB’s Big Garden Birdwatch this weekend, and at 8.15 a.m. on Saturday I was there to do my duty at the French windows, with coffee and pain au chocolat (for the birds) and newly topped up seeds, fatballs, peanuts and nyjer seeds (for me). For a change, the weather was cloudlessly sunny, and so I hoped for rather better things than last year, when in the dank and wet almost nothing put in an appearance.

View original post 224 more words

SHOW & TELL: A Weaver’s Tale

Standard

 – with kind permission of Judith StClaire

Judith lives in Humbolt Bay, USA and these are direct copies from her blog: The Artful Weaver:  https://judithstclaire.wordpress.com
I met Judith on the blogging course we have both been ‘attending’ for most of January – well met, no we have never met, only corresponded thro’ the online portal set up for class members.  We were encouraged to check out each others blogs, I found hers fascinating.  Not only is she a weaver, but she also writes great short stories.
This is the story of a woven scarf that went wrong, and got put away in a drawer, until someone suggested that she find another use for it –
now read on!

 

Handwoven Scarf from Colorful Needlepoint Yarn

Several years ago when they were in middle school or beginning high school, I gave Mother’s needlepoint yarn, canvas and other crafting stuff to my granddaughter Kimberly and her friend (my borrowed granddaughter) Shannon.   With the yarn, I gave them encouragement to Make Something Creative.   And they did.  Over the next several years, they made lots of things.

On Loom_0006But when the girls graduated, got jobs, moved into their own apartment and began to look toward higher education – you guessed it – the leftover yarn and all the other leftover “stuff” came back to me.

I was on the verge of pitching out the large bag of vibrant color, but then I asked my sister’s advice.  Practical as ever, Ruthie, the master weaver, said, “Never throw yarn away!  Weave a scarf.”  On Loom_0004

As it happens, I had some hanks of nice soft gray yarn I wasn’t too sure what to do with, and when I put them with the color, I began to picture a completed project.

Needlepoint yarn usually is cut into handy lengths for those who use it.  Even though the yarn I used for red stripes was the longest in of all the yarns in the bag, the longest pieces proved to be too short to make a warp of the required length.  So, I had to make extensions. (For you non-weavers, the extensions were in the “loom waste” section of the warp.)  Making extensions wasn’t difficult to do, and the doing of it added to my meager library of weaving experience.

Needle Pt on Deck1

Without enough of any one color, I had to combine all the shades of my chosen color in order to make the scarf.  Short supply of short scraps forced me to be somewhat avant guard and make an asymmetrical design – sort of like, we’ll pile all the stripes on this end and make the other end plain.  The thought in the back of my mind was, “If worst comes to worst and this is a total flop, the danged thing could find its way into the doggie bed.”

Needle Pt on bench2In the end, however, I loved the design.  Loosely woven, the wool, strip measured seven feet long, then shrunk to six feet in length after being washed and “fulled”.  (This is not counting a good four inches of fringe on each end.)  After the washing, the tag ends of yarn were cut and the fringe trimmed.  The lovely thing was steam pressed, hung up to dry thoroughly, and ultimately was photographed.

Freshly showered and dressed in my favorite outfit, I stood before the full length mirror, and with great anticipation, flung the scarf around my neck.  My first reaction after a satisfied smile was, “Yikes!”

Needle Pt on Fence1The gray yarn was indeed soft, but the needlepoint yarn was the prickliest yarn I have ever wound around my own neck.  So, I found another use for the scarf fabric.  This piece will not find its way to the doggie bed.

To see more editions of my SHOW & TELL feature, please see the Show & Tell Archive Page.  Anyone is welcome to send in photographs of their work and have their own SHOW & TELL page – please read the instructions on the archive.

the chickens that live up the hill

Standard
my millefluere barbu d'uccle hen

my millefluere barbu d’uccle hen

Have just been up the hill, behind my house, for a quick look at the chickens that live up there, in a really well build open sided barn, with netting protecting them, and access to the field.  They hadn’t been let out yet and thought I come to feed them – sorry girls I said, you’ll have to wait.

I had a small flock of chickens last year, but the fox was really wily, and he got all but my little bantam – she’s so small she wasn’t worth eating!

Millefleure (literally, a thousand flowers, or many colours) barbu d’uccles are originally a Belgian breed – correct me if I’m wrong – and are really friendly garden hens – ‘missy’ loves sitting on my shoulder and is so small that its really quite comfortable!

I have got her a companion, and would love to get some more, but I’m waiting, ’til the winter is over and the foxes aren’t so hungry!

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: