Tag Archives: weaving

my new “around the world” archive page

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I have just added a new page – have a look!

all the relevant posts that have been published are listed in date order

clustrmap july

An Archive of Posts from Around the World

I have readers all over the world – how do I know? – because WordPress has a very good stats system and I can see where you all come from!  It always amazes me how you find me!

In addition, when its working, the ClustrMap widget gives me even more information – for example in the period from 31 March – 20 July there were 968 US visitors and only 659 visitors from the UK!

Other visitors came from almost every country around the world – including, in no particular order-  Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Peru, Kuwait, Thailand, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Kenya, Russia, China, Japan and every country in Europe.

If you want to check this, the widget is at the very end of the “blog roll” on the right hand side of this page.  Just click on it!

You can also get for your own blog – just follow the instructions given on their site.

I occasionally post articles I find about crafting subjects from countries around the world and thought it might be useful to create a special archive page to collect them together for you.

NB;  I SELL AROUND THE WORLD TOO!  You can find me on these sites – julz craft supplies on etsy –julzcraftsupplies on ebay and julzweaving on ebay.  You are also welcome to BUY DIRECT – PLEASE CONTACT ME through this blog by clicking on the red links in this paragraph!

A STEAL! – How to knit vertical buttonholes ….

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I don’t suppose knitting daily  will object to me stealing the latest offering I found in my email box just now – smile.  They are part of the Interweave Group, which covers spinning & weaving as well as knitting and other crafts.  You may find their books, e-books and tutorials useful, altho’ you will have to pay for them.  This is one of their rare freebies!

 

Learn It: The Vertical Buttonhole
Kathleen Cubley
Editor, Knitting Daily
KnittingDaily.com
16ButtonCardi2
Sixteen Button Cardigan
by Cecily Glowik Macdonald

We’re celebrating the 10th anniversary of Knitscene, and I’ve had the pleasure of looking through my collection of back issues in preparation for writing this newsletter. I discovered a well-loved copy of the spring 2009 issue, featuring a wonderful tutorial on buttonholes, by technical editor Karen Frisa. It also contains a pattern called the Sixteen Button Cardigan. Yeah. That’s a lot of buttonholes. But it’s so cute!

I have a love-hate relationship with buttonholes, leaning a little more toward the hate than the love. Mine tend to be too loose, which is a bummer when the buttons slip out of the holes. For one cardigan, I had to resort to sewing up parts of each of the buttonholes to make them tighter, and they ended up too tight, so the cardigan is now a pullover. Not the best solution.

In her article, Karen talks about vertical buttonholes, which intrigue me, especially for buttonbands with vertical ribbing. Here’s an excerpt of that article for you.

Working a Vertical Buttonhole

What did you think of your last buttonholes? Were they a little loose? Too tight? Didn’t work well with the stitch pattern on your band? Maybe you haven’t even made a buttonhole before.

Knitters can take two approaches when it comes to pairing buttons and buttonholes: choose the button first, then create a buttonhole that works with it; or choose the buttonhole first, then choose a button that works with it.

1Vertical-buttonhole
Vertical Buttonhole

In either case, aim for a hole that is a little snug for your button, so that the button won’t slip back through the hole unexpectedly. Here’s how to make one of the lesser used but very nice buttonholes, a vertical buttonhole.

The vertical buttonhole can be sized to fit your button, but the opening is vertical rather than horizontal. This variation can be nice when working in ribbing or another stitch pattern with a strong vertical line, but it is a little fiddly to work. The vertical split for this buttonhole is made by working up one side of the buttonhole, then breaking the yarn, rejoining it at the bottom of the buttonhole, and working up the other side.

Make this buttonhole as follows: Work to the buttonhole location. *Turn, work to end of row, turn, work to buttonhole location; repeat from * until buttonhole is the correct height. Break yarn. Rejoin yarn to bottom of buttonhole. Work to end of row. *Work to buttonhole location, turn, work to end of row; repeat from * until buttonhole is the correct height. On next row, work across all stitches. This last step closes the top of the buttonhole.

The yarn ends can be used to reinforce the top and bottom of the buttonhole.

—Karen Frisa, Knitscene Spring 2009

The topic of buttonholes brings up buttonbands. Here are some tips for knitting great buttonbands.

Buttonband Tips

• Use a knitting needle one or even two sizes smaller than the one used for the body of the garment. This smaller size will make a firmer band that is less likely to droop.

• When picking up stitches for a band, consider the stitch gauge of the band pattern versus the row gauge of the garment. For example, if your band stitch pattern has five stitches per inch, and if your garment has seven rows per inch, then pick up five stitches for every seven rows on the garment. You could do this as follows: *pick up 1 stitch in each of next 3 rows, skip 1 row, pick up 1 stitch in each of next 2 rows, skip 1 row; rep from * for length of band. This sequence makes a band that lies flat.

• Buttons don’t need to be evenly spaced. Clustering buttons in groups of two or three along a band can be pretty and unexpected.

• Choose buttons that complement your garment in terms of size and weight as well as style. Too many heavy buttons on a lightweight garment can pull it out of shape; tiny buttons on a heavier garment can be lost. Shank buttons create some room for the knitted fabric behind the button. If you have a delicate fabric, place a backing button (a small, thin button) or a piece of felt on the wrong side of the band (inside the garment) behind the visible button.

• Traditionally, buttonholes for a woman’s or girl’s garment are on the right band (as it’s worn); for a man’s or boy’s, they’re on the left.

These are the types of articles you’ve come to expect in Knitscene , along with fashion-forward designs and styling. We’re offering a terrific collection to celebrate Knitscene‘s 10th birthday: a collection of every issue of Knitscene since it’s debut, plus all of the Accessories issues. Get yours today, in print or digital.

Here’s to better buttonholes, and to 10 years of Knitscene.

Cheers,
1KCsig

It’s taken a while but I’ve finally got some niddy noddys – smile!

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small niddy niddySome lovely people in Wales who specialise in spinning & weaving equipment and mainly make them using hand turning – a skill I am slowly acquiring – very slowly – as the ‘class’ is only once a week – have agreed to supply me with some of the tools I can no longer get from Kromski.

(That is a long story, but, suffice to say, I am not buying  their products any more – a shame in many ways – but I could not rely on deliveries etc.)

I have been looking around for alternative suppliers for some time, for the full range of spinning & weaving equipment, and have even asked various people to make things for me, only to find someone took my ideas and sold the products themselves!

However, the joke is on them, because I purposely didn’t give them the full information, and they haven’t yet realised that there are some faults in the design. Nasty of me – no – just being cautious!

I picked up the first order the other day, and the full range is up on my julzweaving site on ebay.

I have not yet put any of these in my etsy shop,  as I have not got a great deal of everything yet, and want to see how well they go on ebay first.

So – a quick look at what I have ordered this time – see the gallery below – and if you want to buy any of them, please use the julzweaving link above – thanks.

As ever, to see the captions, hover over the picture, or click on any picture to get a slide show.

OH – and I purposely wrote the title so that it would get people wondering what I was talking about – smile!

L is for looms for weaving

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LYou might be surprised to know that you don’t really need a loom to weave, or at least not a conventional one.

You just need to be able to put a set of vertical parallel threads (the warp) under tension, so that you can ‘weave’ other threads, of any material, horizontally – ‘under and over’ them – (the weft) – to form a piece of ‘material’ that will remain in place and can be used as a wall hanging.  Common yarns used are wool, cotton, linen, silk or a mix of any type of yarn

There are all kinds and sizes of looms that can produce all kinds of cloth, which can be taken off the loom and used to make braids, straps, clothes, blankets, rugs, carpets etc.

warp & weft in a plain weave

warp & weft in a plain weave

This diagram is just to show the basic weave, and the warp & weft.

Most yarns can be used for the weft, but only yarns that will take the tension without breaking can be used for the warp see here.

There are many other types of patterns that can be woven, and more complicated looms that can allow you to weave these, but the basic loom can be as simple as two lengths of wood.

Women_weaving_in_Beni_Hassan_tomb_(Вертикальный_ткацкий_станок_Египет) Flax was the predominant fibre in ancient Egypt (3600 BCE) and this is a picture comes from a wall on a tomb from this period.

You can see that one length of wood was fixed to the wall, and another weighed down by a sack on the floor. The warp seems to be being held under tension by the two weavers, who would be passing the weft yarn across the warp to each other, using shuttles that have been wound with the flax – the cross beams in the diagram.

f6b6dacfb8b3681be4f1316c0c2d7dd3This simple method is still used for weaving ‘Persian’ carpets.  This is a specialised type of ‘tapestry weaving’ using single knotted threads to make very complex patterns – the loom is enormous and is hung from the ceiling.

matchbox weaving from http---marisa-ramirez.tumblr.com

matchbox weaving

On the other hand, you can just as easily make something small like this – using a matchbox as a loom, and piercing the cardboard to create the warp.  The wood from a picture frame also makes a basic loom – just choose your size of frame and warp it up!

52b1593d3590c4645fb3a067ea0f939bSome beautiful wall hangings can be made with very simple looms, and if you really want to play with weaving ideas, you can try this kind of set up for weaving anything from plastic bags, to lengths of  tree bark, adding embellishments like lengths of ribbon, beads knotted onto the threads, un-spun wool fibres tucked into the weft – the world is your oyster – and yes you can use shells too!

woman working with a backstrap loom in Guatemala

woman working with a backstrap loom in Guatemala

Another fascinating ancient  weaving method is the backstrap loom, where you actually wear the loom!  The warp is attached to a tree, or something stable, and to keep the tension up, the weaver wears a belt around the back of her waist.

She sits on the floor so that she can move further away from the fixed point when she needs to extend the length of the woven piece, thus keeping the warp taut.

If you would like to make your own backstrap loom, I found a really good set of instructions here.

A Picanol rapier loom

A Picanol rapier loom

So how did we get from these easily understandable looms to this industrial monster!  To be honest, I’ve no idea, but this is how most cloth is woven industrially – I can’t see a single  person in this shot!

ALL THE PHOTOS IN THIS POST HAVE BEEN PINNED TO MY WEAVING IDEAS BOARD ON  PINTEREST.

If you click on any image on the board, you will see that below it, there is usually some text that tells you where the image came from. Click on the text to see the full article and credits. I have not had room to add them all here.  There are also loads of other weaving ideas on this board – feel free to browse – and to copy them to your own board – and by following links to other weavers boards you can access loads more information and inspiration!

HAPPY WEAVING!

Woman’s Hour (BBC Radio 4) on ‘The Business of Crafts’

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bbc_radio_four Prompted by an Easter theme, and broadcast yesterday, Easter Monday, this is an interesting slant on the “business of crafts”, by the BBC Radio 4’s long running Woman’s Hour.  Unusually, the whole programme was about crafts, and features several woman who have made successful businesses from their their various crafts.

The full programme is 45 mins long – so make sure you bookmark this page if you are not able to listen to it in one go!

NB: if you go to the page on the website below, its broken up into the separate interviews, which allows you to choose which of them you’d like to hear – might be easier for you – the pattern for the scarf kimono was not there last time I checked, but no doubt, it will be up asap. (9 May – you can find the pattern here)

A Celebration of Craft

Listen in pop-out player

a scarf what I wove!

a scarf what I wove!

 The UK economy is boosted to the tune of 3.4 billion per annum by craft skills, which also provide millions of hobbyists an outlet for problem solving, creativity and sustainability.

Far from being design’s handy little sister, craft is practiced by three quarters of women with ever improving skill.

We explore the past, present and future of making with a look at the history of women and craft and craft education. We meet a woman who has embarked on craftivism; three women who have turned their passion and skill into a business and hear about the benefits of craft to focus and de-stress. And Jane Garvey wrestles with a sewing machine.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Corinna Jones.

If by any chance this does not work for you, here is the direct link to the Woman’s Hour Page

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05plght